How to Track Your Car’s Performance Like a Pro

Keeping track of your car’s performance can be a difficult task, but it’s crucial for making informed decisions when it comes time to tune your car. There are many ways you can track performance, from installing gauges in the dashboard to using apps on your phone. The question is: what should you be tracking?

This article will explore the various data points that can help give an accurate picture of how your car is performing. This isn’t meant to be the only list of things that count; rather, it’s simply the most affordable way to start. There are many other more advanced ways of keeping tabs on your car’s performance, but this list is designed to be simple and easy to use for the everyday driver.

Before we get into the list itself, let’s go over some general guidelines:

  1. You should always have a proper professional inspection done before buying any parts or tuning packages. We recommend having at least one major tune-up every year, with regular oil changes in between. This will not only keep your car running smoothly, but will also help you gauge its performance over time.
  2. It’s important to note that these are simply data points and do not take into account other factors such as driving style or road conditions. For example, if you’re constantly driving in stop-and-go traffic with a heavy foot, then your engine temperature readings will be higher than someone who drives gently on the highway. With that said, let’s get started!

Engine Temperature (ET)

This is probably the most common thing people check when tuning their car. If you own an older model, then a simple thermometer will do the job; if not, there are many digital car gauges available nowadays which can be plugged into the OBD II port on your vehicle’s dashboard. The reason why ET is so important is that it gives an accurate reading of how hot or cold your engine is. In general, engines run best at around 90 Celsius. If your engine is running too hot, then it’s probably being pushed hard and needs a tune-up; if it’s running too cold, then there may be an issue with the cooling system.

Oil Pressure (OP)

This data point measures how much oil is flowing through your engine at any given moment. It’s important because it gives you an idea of whether or not your engine is properly lubricated, which affects performance greatly. If your OP reading is too low, then it’s time to get a fresh oil filter and change the oil. If your OP reading is too high, then you may have an issue with internal engine wear, which means further investigation by a professional mechanic is in order.

Throttle Angle (TA)

This measures how much throttle is being applied at any given moment. It gives an idea of whether or not you’re pushing your car hard; if so, then the temperature will rise significantly. The more you push it, the higher your TA reading will be. If you’re driving normally then TA should be in the low to mid-range.

Brake Temperature (BT)

This measures how hot your brakes are at any given moment. It’s important because if your brakes get too hot, they may begin to deteriorate or fail completely. Driving style plays a big role here as well; for example, if you have a heavy foot and regularly brake hard without modulation, then your BT reading will be higher than someone who drives gently. Brakes perform best at around 300 Celsius, so if yours are running hot, then it’s time to cool them off with some good old-fashioned driving.

Coolant Temperature (CT)

This measures how hot your coolant is at any given moment. It’s important because if your engine isn’t properly cooled, it can lead to a wide array of problems such as blown head gaskets and cracked cylinder heads. Driving style plays a big role here as well; for example, if you have a heavy foot and regularly push the car hard without cooling off, then your CT reading will be higher than someone who drives gently. The engine runs best at around 100 Celsius, so if yours is running hot, then it’s time to cool it down with a drive through the park or by turning on the air conditioning.

Fuel Efficiency (FE)

This measures how much fuel is consumed during a certain trip. It’s important because it gives you an idea of how much fuel you’re spending on your daily commute, which can be used as a baseline for comparison over time. If you see that FE is getting lower every month, then there may be something wrong with the engine or other components; if not, then it simply means you’ve pushed the car hard and have put more strain on its systems than usual. The engine runs best at around 8.5 km/l, so if yours is running low, see what you can do to drive more efficiently.

Horsepower (HP)

This measures how much power the engine is producing at any given moment. It’s important because it gives an idea of how much stress your car is under and whether or not you’re driving aggressively. If your HP reading is too high, then there may be something wrong with the engine or other components; if not, then it simply means you’ve pushed the car hard and have put more strain on its systems than normal. A performance decrease usually indicates that the engine isn’t running at full capacity.

Torque

This measures how much torque the engine is producing at any given moment. It’s important because it gives an idea of how much stress your engine is under and whether or not you’re driving aggressively. If your torque reading is too high, then there may be a problem with the engine or other components; if not, then it simply means you’ve pushed the car hard and have put more strain on its systems than usual. Your car will perform optimally when the engine is running at 100 Nm. If it’s low, take a break and let your car recover.

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