Infant-Directed Singing Can Encourage Mother-Child Bondage: New Study Suggests

Engagement through cradle songs is much more efficient in holding kids’ attention contrary to reading books and narrating stories, suggested a new study.

Mothers singing songs to their children are an age-old tradition that can be found in diverse culture and civilisation. While earlier, singing lullabies to the newborn baby was estimated to be a mere trick to keep the baby engaged, a new study has turned up with some new benefits of mothers singing cradle songs to their children.

The new study, conducted by a team of US-based researchers has revealed that mothers singing cradle songs to their newborn babies are more fortunate than other non-singing mums. Singing lullabies strengthen the bondage between the mom-baby and make both feel more attached to each other. The research paper, published in the Journal of Music Therapy also found that by singing songs, mothers can facilitate their babies with the much-needed sensory stimulation, which eventually can engage kids’ attention and transform their arousal.

The researchers, in their new findings, highlighted the role of ‘infant-directed singing’ in simulating the bondage between mother and infant. For their research, the analysts from the University Of Miami Frost School Of Music filmed 70 newborn babies and monitored the responses of the children to six diverse interactions including – mother singing an assigned song, stranger singing designated song, mothers singing their song of choice, book reading by mothers, mothers playing with toys, and the mother and infant jointly listening to the recorded music.

After a through observation, the analysts found the higher cognitive scores among babies during the infant-directed singing, which is recorded as pretty lower in other cases. The study also suggests that mothers singing songs to their newborns are as effective as playing with toys and reading books and for keeping the babies engaged and maintaining their attention. The Infant-Directed Singing is also found to be more effective than mother and children listening to recorded music. The study paper, led by de l’Etoile also highlighted that Infant-Directed Singing gives infants the much-needed sensory stimulation.